Author Topic: First Ebike - First RadPower  (Read 327 times)

dcdear

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
First Ebike - First RadPower
« on: November 19, 2023, 09:30:12 AM »
I'm looking for current recommendations for a first time ebike owner. I'm retiring soon, and think an ebike will meet most of my needs for traveling around. I won't be going on trails with it. Basic errands. I'd like an ebike with a back rack/basket for groceries, again not a lot. Based on the RadPower bikes currently being offered, what would you recommend? I live a cold climate - Edmonton AB Canada. So packed snow, some ice will be a consideration.

Front basket? Or back basket? Any accessory suggestions appreciated.
I've been looking at the RadRunner2 and the RadRover 6 Plus. But other recommendations are welcome.

TIA - Doug

JimInPT

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 769
    • View Profile
Re: First Ebike - First RadPower
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2023, 01:54:27 PM »
How tall are you, and leg inseam?  I'm 5'7" with 29" inseam, my 2021 MiniST2 fits me like a glove and is about the same size as a Runner or Contract (my name for the Expand, which is a de-featured MiniST, sadly).  A Rover or even City would be too tall for comfortable stops especially, and would be a handful on the hardpacked-dirt woods trails I like to ride (not mountain-bike stuff, just mucking about on the walking/horse trails).

If you want baskets; I'd recommend one in the rear for two reasons: the extra weight on the steering geometry and a headlight that is fixed and doesn't turn with the front wheel (a front basket moves the headlight to the front of the frame-mounted basket).  And depending on age/agility, I would HIGHLY recommend a stepthrough model from any manufacturer, especially if you expect to have tall bags of groceries etc. in a rear basket, for me that's a swingover height my knees/hips just won't do anymore.

For my height, inseam and needs, I wouldn't sell my MiniST2 at gunpoint.  It's just right.

Hope this helps a bit.
Shucks Ma'am, I'm no "Hero Member", I just like to wear this cape.

dcdear

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
Re: First Ebike - First RadPower
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2023, 08:43:28 PM »
How tall are you, and leg inseam?  I'm 5'7" with 29" inseam, my 2021 MiniST2 fits me like a glove and is about the same size as a Runner or Contract (my name for the Expand, which is a de-featured MiniST, sadly).  A Rover or even City would be too tall for comfortable stops especially, and would be a handful on the hardpacked-dirt woods trails I like to ride (not mountain-bike stuff, just mucking about on the walking/horse trails).

If you want baskets; I'd recommend one in the rear for two reasons: the extra weight on the steering geometry and a headlight that is fixed and doesn't turn with the front wheel (a front basket moves the headlight to the front of the frame-mounted basket).  And depending on age/agility, I would HIGHLY recommend a stepthrough model from any manufacturer, especially if you expect to have tall bags of groceries etc. in a rear basket, for me that's a swingover height my knees/hips just won't do anymore.

For my height, inseam and needs, I wouldn't sell my MiniST2 at gunpoint.  It's just right.


Hope this helps a bit.

Thanks -- this helps. I'm a 30 inseam.

JimInPT

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 769
    • View Profile
Re: First Ebike - First RadPower
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2023, 11:05:35 AM »
Thanks -- this helps. I'm a 30 inseam.

You're very welcome.  Say, if you end up buying a Rad bike, please consider using Ryan's (this forum's owner/operator) link at the bottom of the page to get him a little kickback from the sale - doesn't change your order or cost you anything.  I got a lot of help here in my early days, so I'm happy to do what I can to support it.
Shucks Ma'am, I'm no "Hero Member", I just like to wear this cape.

Muskie1

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 77
    • View Profile
Re: First Ebike - First RadPower
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2023, 03:33:21 PM »
 I have a Rad Mini 4 , wish I would have got a step thru.
 I have a front and rear basket,  I use Clevermade collapsible milk crates so when not in use I fold them down.
 I would suggest to check area bike shops to see if you can get a Rad serviced if needed. I have done all my repairs myself.
 The biggest negative is weight of the bikes. I keep mine in my house and getting it in and out with the few steps I have is a pain. I only use it for long rides now , I bought another bike for shorter trips that is about 25 lbs lighter and hardly use the Rad.
 

handlebar

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 521
    • View Profile
Re: First Ebike - First RadPower
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2023, 05:56:23 PM »

Thanks -- this helps. I'm a 30 inseam.

After I bought my first ebike, I learned that a bicycle inseam is different from a tailor inseam. I wish they didn't use the same word. A bicycle inseam is how high you can straddle. I usually wear 30 inch pants, but I can straddle 35 inches.

I bought a Radrunner 1, partly because I was led to believe the fat tires would be good on snow or mud. It's disgusting on snow or mud. When I steer, the lightly loaded front tire rides up onto the slippery surface and slides sideways. I was able to get by, by reducing the pressure to 10 psi so that the cross section of the tread against the surface was flat instead of rounded. However, Radpower says low pressure is unsafe. It's not good for those tires. The rolling resistance is high and the handling is bad.

Other tires might handle low pressure better, but there's little choice to fit the Radrunner's wide rims.

The Aventon Abound looks very good to me. The tires are 2.4 inches wide, which should mean higher loading and less side sliding. If it turns out that they don't handle low pressures well, there are plenty of options to fit those rims.

The seat tube angles back at 63 degrees from horizontal, which means the seat goes back almost an inch for each two inches you raise it. That helps it fit long and short legs. It has a drop seat, which means you can set it high for good pedaling but immediately lower it several inches for stability. The handlebars are quickly adjustable over a large height range.

It's designed to carry 440 pounds. There are huge panniers to go on the back rack, and it comes with footboards that support the panniers.

It has a 750 watt motor. I thought that was illegal in Canada, but Canadian dealers offer them.

I don't know what I'll do with my perfectly good Radpower bikes, but I think I've talked myself into buying an Abound!

Ddaybc

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 237
    • View Profile
Re: First Ebike - First RadPower
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2023, 08:18:13 AM »
The Radrunner 3 Plus looks like it would work for you. It's what I would have bought when I bought my Rad Wagon 4 if it would have been available. It's a step through, can carry cargo and it's wheelbase is short so it will load on a regular size car rack.

John Rose

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 62
  • ...
    • View Profile
Re: First Ebike - First RadPower
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2023, 03:21:38 PM »
@dcdear - If you think you might be wanting to drive with it in a car to some remote place and ride the ebike around there, then you might want to get a folding model. Or, if you live in an apartment with a small elevator, and/or limited storage space.
RadMini ST 2 / RadExpand 5

inoxa

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 145
    • View Profile
Re: First Ebike - First RadPower
« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2023, 08:38:10 AM »
Step thru is the way I go.  I have the mid step RAD Rover 5.  Been a great bike but has always been difficult for me to mount as I have the seat high for full leg extension for maximum use of my legs.  I am 5'8".

I now have a step thru of another brand.  Much easier to mount.  It is stronger than RAD too. 

I have read many have problems with folding bikes due to crimped wiring when folding and the wiring harnesses having to be replaced.  And they are still difficult to lift and place in a car. 

I have had a rear rack but again hard to get the leg over it.  If you get the rear rack, get the smaller one.  Three reasons.  One you rarely fill the larger one.  Two harder to your leg over it if you don't have a step thru.  and Three it can interfere with your seat.   The front rack can make it difficult to steer. 

 

dcdear

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
Re: First Ebike - First RadPower
« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2023, 05:58:07 PM »
Thanks everyone for your comments. Many things to consider and I appreciate all the advice.

John Rose

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 62
  • ...
    • View Profile
Re: First Ebike - First RadPower
« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2023, 06:26:14 PM »
Step thru is the way I go.
The one thing it's taking me a while to get used to with a step-through is that when I stop and stand there straddling the bike, and let go of the handlebars (to fiddle with phone or water bottle), I expect the bike to not fall over because the crossbar would normally be trapped between my legs. Twice since I got it last September I've had to pick it up.  :-[

It'll just take me a while to remember to stand back a bit and steady it with the front of the saddle.

Also, I was always in the habit of carrying a bike (like up and down stairs) by hoisting the crossbar up onto my shoulder, but I'm not likely to want to do that with a 70 pound bike anyway.

Otherwise, yeah, a step-thru has a lot of advantages.
RadMini ST 2 / RadExpand 5